Gadget Addiction: Admission is Always the First Step

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Our minds are becoming bookended by glass.

—Google co-founder Sergey Brin, speaking at TED earlier today

This statement is notable because it’s safe to assume that as an original Googler, Sergey Brin has profited handsomely from people’s addictions to that very same ‘glass’ he speaks of. Google’s Android is the most popular mobile operating system in the world with as many as 700 million active Android devices. Sure, part of his motivation for describing the use of smartphones as ’emasculating’ may have been the fact that he was hocking Google Glass, the company’s newest gadget that places many of the smartphone’s functions right into your field of vision (which is aimed to bring information ‘closer to our senses’) using a connected pair of futuristic glasses that remind me of something future soldiers or cyborgs would wear. (The Verge’s Joshua Topolsky has spent time with the glasses and you can read his fascinating take here.)

With all their speed forward, connected devices have actually taken us a step back in civilization

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Has the Battleground Shifted in the ‘Console Wars?’

It ain’t 2006 anymore…

Let’s face facts, the console wars aren’t what they used to be. Back in 2005 when Microsoft raced to rush out release the Xbox 360 a year ahead of its competitors at Nintendo and Sony, the buzz for the next generation of consoles was truly palpable and the competition would prove to be fierce. A quick Wikipedia search of lifetime console sales puts Wii at just under 100 million, Xbox 360 at 76 million, and PS3 at 70 million (or as high as 77 million according to IDC estimates), ranking 3rd, 4th, and 5th all time, respectively.

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5+ Reasons to Stop Worrying and Embrace iOS Jailbreaking

Before I go into detail, let’s take a quick look at the original definition of jailbreak.

From Dictionary.com:

noun

1. an escape from prison, especially by forcible means.

The “prison” here is Apple’s restrictive “walled garden” operating system (iOS) that allows little to no customization by its users. “Forcible means” is the software that allows users to hack into Apple’s delicately crafted OS. And the “escape” is users having fun in this new freer playground. You get the picture.

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My Music Map: A Visual History [Updated]

My earliest memory of music is probably my mom’s Thriller album. I remember the vinyl jacket – Michael Jackson clad in black & white just glowing and laying back casually, looking like coolest guy I’d ever seen. At 34, my memory isn’t what it used to be, so there may be earlier memories buried deep down in my subconscious and forgotten dreams, but when you think about it, in 1983, what album mattered more than Thriller? So it’s no surprise that it may be my first memorable music memory, if you will.

This nostalgia got me to thinking about how my music listening has evolved over the years. Here’s a visual tour through the evolution. I’ll limit words to just the captions and headings. Let’s call it a “Music Map.” (Credit to coworker Sheila L for the name)

1983 – 1987: A Thrilling Start

This image is roughly what I remember: circular nobs in front, plastic dust cover, faux wood body, and boxy speakers with that soft cushiony cover over the speakers.

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Can We Have a Reasonable Discussion About Video Games and Violence?

In 2008 I wrote a college paper titled, “The Backlash Against Violence in Video Games.” At the time, the latest Grand Theft Auto title has just been released and some of the best-selling video games came from “shooter” franchises like Call of Duty, Gears of War, and Metal Gear Solid. In fact, according to NPD (via BitgGamer), four of the top five games sold on the Xbox 360 were heavy on gun violence. So, just as with movies and other media, it was an era when violent content moved the needle on unit sales.

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Top 10 TV Series Since 2000 [Updated with Link to ‘Deadwood’ Fight]

As a child of the 80s and 90s, I bore witness to the tail end of the so-called Golden Age of broadcast TV, when sitcoms, cop dramas, and (later) reality TV ruled the free airwaves. These shows routinely garnered sky-high ratings at a time when original cable shows were still far inferior in quality and certainly viewership.

But a strange thing happened once the new millennium turned. Some of the most creative minds in television—future pioneers such as David Simon (The Wire), David Chase (The Sopranos), Vince Gilligan (Breaking Bad) and Matthew Weiner (Mad Men)—started looking beyond the traditional formulaic TV formats and looked to films for inspiration. Instead of creating 24 essentially standalone episodes of a show spread out over 6 months, these and other early pioneers began creating what essentially amounted to 13-hour movies that rewarded careful viewing and attention to detail. And here’s the thing, even the most viewed shows’ ratings paled in comparison to some of the astronomical numbers of broadcast TV’s salad days. And I think TV is all the better for it. Once cable gained traction and writers were able to flee the FCC’s broadcast strictures, I believe a new Golden Age emerged, an age where quality trumps viewership numbers. So without further ado, here is my list of my top 10 TV series since 2000. Ranked. No copping out behind, “No, I can’t rank them,” blah blah blah.

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1. The Wire (HBO, 2002 – 2007) – This show turned the cop show formula on its head. An unfiltered look at villainous heroes and heroic villains. Possibly the greatest anti-hero in TV history (Omar Little). Small characters routinely had big moments—a true ensemble cast. Rewarded careful watching. Underrated humor that helped soften some of the harder moments. For my money, I put season 4, which looked at a broken education system and the kids struggling within it, against any season of any show in the history of TV.

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Is Netflix’s ‘House of Cards’ a Sneak Preview of TV’s Future?

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Last night, my wife and I curled up on the couch and watched the first two episodes—both directed by David Fincher of Se7en and Social Network fame—of Netflix’s second original series, House of Cards, which debuted Friday night and was developed by independent production company Media Rights Capital. The episodes had quality acting, atmosphere aplenty, and political intrigue that was thicker than grandma’s homemade slow-cooked chili. But with 11 episodes still to go in the 13-episode arc, I cannot provide a full review.

But what I can do, if I so desire, is watch the remaining 11 episodes on my couch (or anywhere else I can get an Internet connection, for that matter) in a half-day-long marathon tomorrow and provide a full series review by early next week.

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Breaking: Sony to Show ‘Future’ at Feb. 20th Event. Yup, it’s the PS4. [Updated]

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Attention PlayStation devotees, the date you’ve all been waiting for can finally be circled on your Crash Bandicoot-themed calendars. According to the Wall Street Journal (via The Verge), Sony will announce the PS3’s successor during a special event on February 20th at 6 PM. Details are scarce, but a Sony rep did tweet out an abstract teaser video with all kinds of Tron-like lasers and shit intended to, um, well just see for yourself. Maybe the PS4 is in there somewhere:

Source: YouTube via The Verge

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